The impacts of influenza on human history

the impacts of influenza on human history Weaponized anthrax, mad cow disease, avian flu—all nominees for the next great epidemic throughout history, diseases have swept the globe, bringing down empires, wrecking economies, and changing the course of history.

On 18 february 2017, the national health and family planning commission of china (nhfpc) reported to who the results of genetic sequencing on virus isolates from two previously reported cases of human infection with avian influenza a(h7n9) virus from guangdong province. Hays (history, loyola u chicago) describes, in a style accessible to high school students and up, the history of 50 epidemics in world history, from an unspecified disease that swept through athens in 430-427 bc to a number of epidemics still plaguing the world today. Webmd provides an overview of influenza -- and a bit of history about the flu efforts to control the impact of the flu are aimed at types a and b, and the remainder of this discussion will be.

General overviews there are quite a number of excellent introductions to the history of epidemics and their effects on history general works, covering broad swaths of human history and geographic space, necessarily overlap slightly. The spanish influenza pandemic, which stands as the single most fatal event in human history, killed an estimated 50 million people or more globally 14 as noted, the causative agent was an avian-descended h1n1 virus and a direct progenitor of all of the influenza a viruses circulating in humans today 2, 3 the high mortality associated with. The currently circulating influenza viruses that cause human disease are divided into two groups: a and b influenza a has 2 subtypes which are important for humans: a(h3n2) and a(h1n1), of which the former is currently associated with most deaths. Bird flu, also called avian influenza, is a viral infection that can infect not only birds, but also humans and other animals most forms of the virus are restricted to birds.

The impact of influenza on human society is most marked at the time of a pandemic it has been estimated that in the 1918-19 spanish influenza pandemic 2 million of australia's population of 5 million were infected and 15,000 died. Influenza is a respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses there are two main types of influenza viruses (a and b) but many different strains of each type the diseases caused by these viruses are often collectively referred to simply as “the flu. People have suffered from influenza for thousands of years viruses identical or closely related to the human form of the infection can be isolated from ducks, turkeys, swine, horses, and many other species of warm-blooded vertebrates, as well.

The spanish flu pandemic of 1918, the deadliest in history, infected an estimated 500 million people worldwide—about one-third of the planet’s population—and killed an estimated 20 million. In 1933, researchers discovered that viruses (influenza virus types a, b, and rarely c) cause influenza (flu) prior to 1933, people thought a bacterium named haemophilus influenzae caused the flu in 1938, jonas salk and thomas francis developed the first vaccine against flu viruses. Second, an influenza a virus can jump from one type of organism, usually a bird, to another type of organism, such as a human, without undergoing major genetic change if the virus mutates in the human host so that it is easily spread among people, a pandemic may result. As is the case for most influenza pandemics, the 1918 strain passed through the human population in three or four pandemic waves, each more lethal than the previous.

The 1918 influenza pandemic (january 1918 – december 1920 colloquially known as: spanish flu) was an unusually deadly influenza pandemic, the first of the two pandemics involving h1n1 influenza virus. Smithsonian magazine the pandemic lasted just 15 months but was the deadliest disease outbreak in human history, killing between 50 million and 100 million people worldwide, according to the.

College-level collections strong in health references will find a powerful, lasting volume in epidemics and pandemics: their impacts on human history: it takes an era-by-era historical approach to plagues from 430bce to modern times, covering events around the world from japan and medieval europe to iceland and the us, adds chapters on. Editor’s note: the swine flu, caused by a strain of the influenza virus common in pigs and having symptoms similar to that of influenza, continues to grow in the us and globally fearing this. The flu was most deadly for people aged between 20 and 40, which meant that it killed a large proportion of the world's workforce the flu affected 28% of all americans and claimed the lives of an.

Influenza's effects are much more severe and last longer than those of the common cold although the virus seems to have caused epidemics throughout human history, historical data on influenza are difficult to interpret,. While the impact of flu varies, it places a substantial burden on the health of people in the united states each year cdc estimates that influenza has resulted in between 92 million and 356 million illnesses, between 140,000 and 710,000 hospitalizations and between 12,000 and 56,000 deaths annually since 2010.

the impacts of influenza on human history Weaponized anthrax, mad cow disease, avian flu—all nominees for the next great epidemic throughout history, diseases have swept the globe, bringing down empires, wrecking economies, and changing the course of history.
The impacts of influenza on human history
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2018.